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Evaluation de la capacité de charge pour les girafes dans la réserve de biosphère de Gadabédji, Niger

Dans le cadre de la conservation de la girafe (Giraffa cameleopardalis perralta L.), huit individus provenant de Kouré ont été réintroduites dans la réserve de biosphère de Gadabédji. Trois ans après cette introduction, il s’avère important d’approfondir les connaissances sur l’écologie de l’espèce. C’est dans ce sens que la présente étude a été initiée dans le but de déterminer la capacité de charge de la réserve de biosphère de Gadabéji (RBG). En effet, les biomasses foliaires totales et accessibles de

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Connaissances locales sur la conservation de la girafe de l’Afrique de l’Ouest (Giraffa camelopardalis peralta) dans la zone Girafe et la Réserve de Biosphère de Gadabedji au Niger

Le dernier troupeau de girafe de l’Afrique de l’Ouest (Giraffa camelopardalis peralta) vit au Niger dans un milieu fortement anthropisée. Cette contrainte l’oblige à partager les ressources naturelles avec les humains d’où la naissance d’un conflit homme-faune. La présente étude sur la dimension humaine dans la conservation de la girafe a été menée dans deux zones de distribution des girafes au Niger dénommée zone girafe et Réserve de Biosphère de Gadabedji (RBG). Elle a pour objectif de contribuer à une

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Estimating Giraffe (Giraffa Camelopardalis) Population Size And Survival Rates In South Luangwa Valley, Zambia

Giraffe populations across their range have declined significantly over the past 40 years. Recent studies of these declines noted that conservation efforts often lack basic population estimates and descriptions of demographic parameters such as sex- and age-specific survival rates. I addressed those research needs for a geographically-isolated population of giraffes (Giraffa camelopardalis) in South Luangwa Valley, Zambia. During 2016 to 2018, collaborators opportunistically photographed giraffes throughout South Luangwa National Park and adjacent Lupande and Lumimba Game Management Areas. Given that

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Skin Papillomas in an Impala (Aepyceros melampus) and a Giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis)

Viral particles, typical of the papovavirus family, were demonstrated by electronmicroscopy in small papillomas found on the feet of an impala (Aepyceros melampus) and on the face of a giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis) in Kenya. Histologically the tissues proved to be typical papillomas. The viral particles measured 38 nm and 40 nm in diameter in all tissue sections from the impala and giraffe respectively.

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Usage of specialized fence-gaps in a black rhinoceros conservancy in Kenya

Fencing is increasingly used in wildlife conservation. Keeping wildlife segregated from local communities, while permitting wildlife access to the greater landscape matrix is a complex task. We investigated the effectiveness of specially designed fence-gaps on animal movement at a Kenyan rhinoceros conservancy, using camera-traps over a four-year period. The fence-gap design restricted the movement of black (Diceris bicornis) and white rhinoceroses (Ceratotherium simum simum) but permitted the movement of other species. We documented over 6000 crossing events of over 50

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Physical meat quality characteristics of Angolan giraffe (Giraffa giraffa angolensis) as affected by sex and muscle

Giraffe numbers grow exponentially when farmed, necessitating periodic culling. This study quantified the effect of sex and muscle on the physical quality characteristics of eight giraffe muscles. The Warner-Bratzler shear force (WBSF) was the only parameter to be affected by an interaction between sex and muscle (P < 0.001), although the interaction for the CIE L* values tended towards significance (P = 0.054). Cooking loss (male = 41.6 ± 0.35%; female = 40.7 ± 0.33%; P = 0.024) and CIE

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Habitat use analysis of the Angolan giraffe (Giraffa giraffa angolensis) in the Kalahari ecosystem

Giraffe populations across the African continent have declined over the past decades, mainly due to habitat loss and fragmentation of subpopulations. To fight the decrease in numbers of the different giraffe species, conservation actions have been and are currently in place, such as translocations into protected areas and reintroductions into areas where giraffes have disappeared. In Namibia, the Angolan subspecies is widely spread and mostly found on private land, which offers the opportunity to study the species in closed environments,

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Diversity, distribution and conservation of land mammals in Mauritania, North-West Africa

Detailed knowledge about biodiversity distribution is critical for monitoring the biological effects of global change processes. Biodiversity knowledge gaps hamper the monitoring of conservation trends and they are especially evident in the desert biome. Mauritania constitutes a remarkable example on how remoteness and regional insecurity affect current knowledge gaps. Mammals remain one of the least studied groups in this country, without a concerted species checklist, the mapping of regions concentrating mammal diversity, or a national assessment of their conservation status.

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Infrared Thermography in Zoo and Wild Animals

Infrared (IR) thermography is a noninvasive diagnostic screening tool that does not require handling or restraint of an animal. Physiologic or pathologic processes involving changes in surface temperature may be evaluated using this technique. This modern method provides real-time, instantaneous visual images with measurements of surface temperatures over a greater distance. The first medical application of “thermography” was by Hippocrates (ca. 460-375 BC), who used thin layers of mud for his temperature measurements, similar to modern thermography. An area of

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Ecology Of African Grazing And Browsing Mammals

Africa is the earth’s second largest continent, comprising 20% of its surface. Largely tropical, Africa extends as well into temperate zones to 37°N and 35°S. Eastern and southern Africa display steep elevation gradients due to the prevalence there of volcanic orogeny and rifting (29). Local landscapes are distinguished by substantial geological heterogeneity, dissected land forms, and resultant steep gradients of precipitation and vegetation. The consequent pronounced fragmentation of habitats and sharp juxtaposition of distinct vegetation types, combined with climatic oscillations

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