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Determination of individual home range size and group composition of the main giraffe population at Entabeni Game Reserve

Large variations in giraffe home range size have been reported in previous studies, where individual home ranges usually overlap. The social structure of giraffe populations is complex and not much research has been done on their group size and group composition. To be able to identify the individual giraffe roaming the lower escarpment of Entabeni Game Reserve (EGR), Limpopo, South Africa an identification catalogue was initially created in February 2011. A total number of 45 giraffe were individually identified in

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Population structure and spatial ecology of Kordofan giraffe in Garamba National Park, Democratic Republic of Congo

Population numbers of Kordofan giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis antiquorum) have declined throughout its range by more than 85% in the last three decades, including in the isolated easternmost population found in the Garamba National Park (NP) in the Democratic Republic of Congo. We provide new data on the conservation status and ecology of Kordofan giraffe in Garamba NP, specifically on the current population dynamics, distribution patterns, and spatial ecology for informed conservation management decisions. Data were gathered between September 26, 2016,

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Movement Patterns And Home Range Sizes Of The Rothschild’s Giraffes (Giraffa camelopardalis Rothschildii) Translocated To Ruma National Park, Kenya.

The need for management of small, wild populations has been given limited attention. The Rothschild’s giraffe is poorly represented in East Africa, therefore, it is important that its populations and environments should be carefully managed to permit its survival. The objective of this study was to determine the movement patterns and home range sizes of the translocated Rothschild’s giraffes in Ruma National Park. Using binoculars, the giraffes were located, aged and sexed. Individuals were recognized by variations in their skin

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Use of home range behaviour to assess establishment in translocated giraffes

Conservation translocation is a management technique employed to introduce, re-introduce or reinforce wild animal and plant populations. Giraffe translocations are being conducted throughout Africa, but the lack of effective post-translocation monitoring limits our ability to assess translocation outcomes. One potential indicator of translocation success is the establishment of characteristic movement and home range behaviour in the new location. We analysed the post-translocation movement patterns of six Global Positioning System-collared Angolan giraffes (Giraffa camelopardalis angolensis) in three regions of Namibia. We

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Enclosure size in captive wild mammals: A comparison between UK zoological collections and the wild

A comparison was made between the average enclosure size of a random sample of mammals lept during the years 2000-2001in a random sample of UK zoological collections and the minimum home range of these taxa in the wild. Allometric laws were used to estimate the home range area, while direct observation from videotaped visits to the collections was used to estimate enclosure size area. The results showed that, as an average, the average enclosure size had an area 100 times

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Movement patterns and herd dynamics among South African giraffes (Giraffa camelopardalis giraffa)

Giraffes reside in a fission–fusion social system, with sex, age proximity, kinship and home range overlap accounting for some of the variance in herd composition, while season, sex, age and time of day influence diet, home range size and distance travelled. To increase our knowledge of habitat use and fission–fusion herd dynamics, we placed GPS devices on eight adult female South African giraffes (Giraffa camelopardalis giraffa) living in the Khamab Kalahari Nature Reserve (South Africa). We tested four predictions about

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Overview of the ecology of the Niger giraffe

The giraffe of Niger are the last in all West Africa. It is threatened. They are both genetically and ecologically distinct from other giraffe and are therefore an important biodiversity remnant. Although baseline research has been limited, it does provide snapshots of what has happened to the population’s numbers and distribution over the past decade. Currently, the population is increasing and genetically healthy, however, its range has been significantly reduced and habitat loss and fragmentation continues to be a major

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Fission-fusion dynamics in wild giraffes may be driven by kinship, spatial overlap and individual social preferences

Many species exhibit fission-fusion dynamics, yet the factors that influence the frequent changes in group size and membership in these species have not been widely studied. Social ties may be influenced by kinship but animals may also form preferred associations because of social attraction or may only associate because they have similar habitat preferences. We investigated the association patterns of 535 wild giraffes, Giraffa camelopardalis, in Etosha National Park, Namibia using behavioural and genetic data from individually identified giraffes. We

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Home range and seasonal movements of Giraffa camelopardalis angolensis in the northern Namib Desert

Estimates of home range size of giraffe in the northern Namib Desert were on average larger than those in other populations. In particular, the largest individual home range of any giraffe bull (1950 km2) was recorded – correlated with low population density, reduced forage density and increased searching for receptive cows. The predominant pattern of movement was linear, along the riparian environments, however, large-scale irregular movements into tributaries and other areas were also recorded. Small-scale movements by bulls into the

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Home range — body mass relations: a field study on African browsing ruminants

Home range data were collected concurrently from four syntopic browsing ruminant species in a conserved savanna ecosystem. Mean home range areas were: giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis) 282 km^2; kudu (Tragelaphus strepciceros) 21.9 km^2; impala (Aepyceros melampus) 5.81 km^2; steenbok (Raphicerus campestris) 0.62 km^2. Home range area (Ahr) scaled on body mass (M) as: Ahr = 0.024 M^1.38 (r^2 = 0.99).

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