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Gazing at a giraffe gyroscope: where are we going?

Giraffe are popular animals to watch while on wildlife safaris, and feature prominently in zoos, advertisements, toys and cartoons. Yet, until recently, few field studies have focused on giraffe. We introduce this giraffe topic issue with a review essay that explores five primary questions: How many (sub) species of giraffe exist? What are the dynamics of giraffe herds? How do giraffe communicate? What is the role of sexual selection in giraffe reproduction? How many giraffe reside in Africa? A confluence

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Analysis of Angolan Giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis angolensis) Post-Translocation Movement Patterns and Implications for Conservation Management in Namibia

Wildlife translocation is a conservation management strategy that has been employed to bolster many diminishing wild animal populations. Giraffe translocations are currently being conducted in Africa, but the consequences of such remain largely unknown. In Namibia, translocations are conducted to re-establish locally extirpated populations or to recover vulnerable ones in and around communal conservancies. This study analyzed the movement patterns of six Angolan giraffes in Namibia post-translocation in three regions. Four of the six giraffes appeared to establish home ranges,

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Foraging ecologies of giraffe and camels in Northern Kenya: Effects of habitat structure and possibilities for competition?

Domestic camels (Camelus dromedarius) have become increasingly popular livestock in arid regions of sub-Saharan Africa. However, little is known about the environmental impacts of these animals, and concern has been mounting about possible competition with wild native ungulates. Unlike the more traditional pastoralist livestock species, camels are large-bodied, long-necked browsers which increases the potential to overlap with wild giraffe foraging, especially as the space available for browsing decreases. Giraffe ecology and social dynamics are poorly understood; it is believed that

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Mapping the spatial configuration and severity of giraffe skin disease in Ruaha National Park, Tanzania

Giraffe numbers, have dropped by about 40% in the last 20 years, making giraffes a species of conservation concern. In the same period of time, a skin disease has been observed in numerous giraffe populations across Africa. The disease, commonly referred to as giraffe skin disease (GSD), manifests as lesions, wrinkled skin, and encrustations that can affect the limbs, shoulder or neck of giraffes. Giraffe skin disease may hinder movement causing increased susceptibility to predation. In chapter 1, I reviewed

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Conservation of large mammals in the Republic of Mali

Populations of large wild mammals exist in one national park and several reserves and protected forest areas in Mali. In addition some wildlife survives in areas, in the south where onchocerciasis and trypanosomiasis, and in the north lack of available water, prevent human settlement. The area of present-day Mali has been populated by a succession of relatively advanced African states during the past 1500 years, who have influenced the vegetation and wildlife. An account of the present status of large

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African Antelope Database

The purpose of this report is to provide those interested in antelope conservation with the information currently held by the IUCN/SSC Antelope Specialist Group on the conservation status of each antelope species (and selected subspecies) in sub-Saharan Africa. This species-wide view complements the country-based reports in other recent Antelope Specialist Group publications. Threats to the survival of antelopes arise fundamentally from the rapid growth of human and livestock populations, and consequent degradation and destruction of natural habitats and excessive offtake

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The impacts of elephant, giraffe and fire upon the Acacia tortilis woodlands of the Serengeti

The reduction in canopy cover of the Seronera woodlands since the mid- 1960s can be largely attributed to the destruction of mature Acacia tortilis trees by elephants. The development of the tree regeneration that has colonized the gaps in the mature canopy is being suppressed by giraffe browsing and periodic burning. A simple model is presented which simulates these impacts upon the dynamics of the A. tortilis population. Height-specific impact rates of these three agents are quantified. Between 1968 and

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