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Diet of lions and spotted hyaenas assessed from stomach contents

Analyses of stomach contents was used to assess the diet of lions and spotted hyaenas in the Central District of Kruger National Park. Of 257 lion and 167 spotted hyaena stomachs examined 47,1% and 10,8% respectively, were empty. The relative edible biomass contributed by each prey animal to the diet of lions is given. For spotted hyaenas the relative importance of each prey animal was assessed by considering both frequency of occurrence and the amount found in each stomach. During

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Cytauxzoonosis In A Giraffe [Giraffa Camelopardalis (Linnaeus, 1758)] In Zululand

Cytauxzoonosis is reported for the first time in a giraffe [Giraffa camelopardalis (Linnaeus, 1758)] that died naturally of the disease. Both histiotropic and erythrocytic parasites were found. The animal was very anaemic and had marked haemoglobinuria. The most significant lesions were disseminated foci of haemorrhage and necrosis, especially in the liver, spleen and abomasum. Multiple haemorrhages also occurred on both pleura and peritoneum, within and on the entire gastro-intestinal tract, on the surface of the kidneys, subepicardially and in the

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History and development of research on wildlife parasites in southern Africa, with emphasis on terrestrial mammals, especially ungulates

The history of wildlife parasitology in South Africa, and to some extent southern Africa, is reviewed, giving a brief overview of the early years and following its development from the founding of the Onderstepoort Veterinary Institute in 1908 until the turn of the century. An emphasis is placed on game species. The main findings on protozoan parasites, including those of carnivores, are presented, starting in the 1890s and leading up to the first decade of the 21st century. Important developments

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Are there phylogenetic differences in salivary tannin-binding proteins between browsers and grazers, and ruminants and hindgut fermenters?

While feeding, mammalian browsers (primarily eat woody plants) encounter secondary metabolites such as tannins. Browsers may bind these tannins using salivary proteins, whereas mammalian grazers (primarily eat grasses that generally lack tannins) likely would not. Ruminant browsers rechew their food (ruminate) to increase the effectiveness of digestion, which may make them more effective at binding tannins than nonruminants. Few studies have included a sufficient number of species to consider possible scaling with body mass or phylogenetic effects on salivary proteins.

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Observations and perceptions of veterinarians and farmers on heartwater distribution, occurrence and associated factors in South Africa

Background: There is currently no scientific evidence regarding the current climatic or other epidemiological factors that could influence the occurrence of heartwater in South Africa. Objectives: The objective was to determine whether climatic changes or other epidemiological factors influence the occurrence of heartwater in South Africa. Method: A survey was conducted to scrutinise these factors using both veterinarians and farmers working in known areas in which heartwater had previously been confirmed to establish the value of each of these factors.

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The spatial ecology, habitat preference and diet selection of giraffe (Giraffa Camelopardalis Giraffa) in the Kalahari region of South Africa

The research project was conducted within two separate study areas. The main research project was conducted in the Khamab Kalahari Nature Reserve (KKNR) in the North West Province of South Africa. The main research project only commenced after the completion of a preliminary study that was conducted on the Woodland Hills Wildlife Estate in the Free State Province of South Africa.Little is known of the environmental impacts on giraffe in this ecological region, and concern has been expressed regarding population

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Evaluating the accuracy of some commonly used game-counting methods

The accuracy of game counts on an eastern Transvaal Lowveld game ranch was examined. A drive count was used to produce control estimates of actual population sizes. A helicopter count was more accurate than one from a fixed-wing aircraft. Twenty-four hour waterhole counts were relatively inaccurate. Line transect counts were relatively accurate when a fixed strip width equal to the mean visibility index of the vegetation was used, and when the population estimate was based on the perpendicular sighting distance.

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The numerical status of sixteen game species in the Transvaal, excluding the Kruger National Park

The paper describes the results of a survey to determine the numbers of the following game species in the Transvaal: springbok, blesbok, zebra, blue wildebeest, black wildebeest, red hartebeest, gemsbok, eland, nyaia, buffalo, elephant, giraffe and squarelipped rhinoceros. The distribution of each species is discussed and the different localities of occurrence are illustrated. The growing concern for the conservation of wildlife in the Transvaal has resulted in an increase in the numbers of most of the species during the past

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The implications of the reclassification of South African wildlife species as farm animals

The Government Gazette No. 42464 dated 17 May 20191 amended Table 7 of the Animal Improvement Act (Act no. 62 of 1998), which lists breeds of animals, to include at least 32 new wild animal species, including 24 indigenous mammals. The list includes threatened and rare species such as cheetah, white and black rhinoceros, and suni. Some alien species such as lechwe, various deer species and rabbits are also included. The cornerstone of the original Act is ‘To provide for

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Observations On Lactation And Milk Composition Of The Giraffe Giraffa Camelopardalis

Milk samples collected from giraffe Giraffa camelopardalis in the eastern Transvaal Lowveld of South Africa were analysed by conventional methods. Changes in the composition of the milk at different stages of the lactation cycle were noted. The prelactation secretion and milk of early lactation was considerably richer than the milk of established lactation in terms of total solids, fat, ash, and protein but not in lactose. Differences in minerals and trace elements were not significant. Giraffe milk is richer than

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