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Interaction entre hommes et girafes dans la zone de distribution de la girafe au Niger

Cette étude qui porte sur l’interaction entre hommes et girafes a été menée dans la zone de distribution de la girafe du Niger dénommée « aire girafe ». Elle a concerné douze (12) villages répartis sur les deux (2) foyers de distribution, la zone centrale et la zone de Fandou. Au total, 218 personnes ont été enquêtées et les données comparées entre villages et entre foyers de troupeau de girafes. Les résultats montrent que les dégâts sur les cultures et

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Maintaining the Population of Thornicroft Giraffes (Giraffa camelopardalis thornicrofti)

There is a lack of information on the Thornicroft giraffe’s population size and of the amount of poaching taking place on the giraffes with in the Southern Luangwa Valley National Park. As of right now the giraffes population appears to be stable but there are a lot of factor unknown pertaining to the threats to the population and to their habitat. The goal of this management plan is to maintain the Thornicroft Giraffes population which is exclusively found in Luangwa

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Body size and habitat as determinants of tick infestations of wild ungulates in South Africa

The purpose of the present work was to test the hypothesis that the intensity of tick infestation on South African wild ungulates is proportional to surface area of the host (body weight 0.67} and to assess the role of habitat preference on the intensity of infestations. The results support previous suggestions that larger ungulates are more important hosts for adult ticks, however, the intensity of infestation of nymphs and larvae is proportional to the surface area of the host. Grazers

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Ecology, Behaviour and Conservation Status of Masai Giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis tippelskirchi) in Tanzania

The focus of this thesis is on the behaviour, ecology and conservation of Masai giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis tippelskirchi) in Tanzania. Giraffes are the most elegant, conspicuous and tallest animals of the African savannah. Giraffes prefer savannah and are responsible for the architectural beauty of trees through browsing. Giraffes are social but are non territorial because individuals within a group are in constant change. Females are more often in mixed herds with calves, whereas males maintain a primarily solitary life. Giraffes

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Giraffa camelopardalis, Giraffe Assessment by: Muller, Z. et al.

Taxonomic Notes: The IUCN SSC Giraffe and Okapi Specialist Group (GOSG) currently recognizes a single species, Giraffa camelopardalis. Nine subspecies of Giraffes are currently recognized (Dagg 2014), although some authorities dispute this taxonomic classification (e.g., Groves and Grubb 2011). Several subpopulations of Giraffe, resident in northern Botswana, northwest Zimbabwe, northeastern Namibia and southwestern Zambia, are potentially either G. c. angolensis, or G. c. giraffa but the continued accumulation of information indicates that a future reassessment might be in order. Until

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The diet selection, habitat preferences and spatial ecology of relocated giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis) in the Kgalagadi Transfrontier Park

Old records and historic eyewitness accounts of giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis) in the Kalahari, led to the decision by park management to reintroduce giraffe in 1991. Twenty years ago (1991) the translocation of 8 giraffe from the Etosha National Park took place to an area in the Kgalagadi Transfrontier Park which there is limited information as to their adaptation success or potential impact on the environment. The giraffe was transported to a specially built boma measuring a few hundred hectares in

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The Ecology and Behaviour of Giraffe in Northern Botswana

Northern Botswana is one of the giraffe strongholds across its geographic range in the absence of, or with low impact from, the major anthropological threats faced elsewhere. Yet despite its conservation significance, until now, no giraffe specific ecological or behavioural studies have been undertaken. Moreover, Africa’s giraffe population has been significantly reduced over the last two decades, and the pressure on giraffe habitats and populations is likely to increase as the human population continues to expand, and the effects of

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Giraffe south of the Niger-Benue river system

Although giraffes have been seen occasionally south of the Niger river, there is no evidence that permanent populations occur in this area) and presumably the giraffes either die or return to the northern side. The southern habitats may be unsuitable for two reasons. First, human harassment and habitat modification may prevent the establishment of viable “southern herds”. Secondly, there may be an absence or inadequacy of particular food plants or some other environmental requirement. These speculations emphasize the necessity of

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A conservation assessment of Giraffa camelopardalis giraffa

Taxonomic notes: Currently, nine subspecies classifications have been proposed for Giraffe (Ansell 1972; Dagg & Foster 1982; Kingdon 1997; East 1999; Grubb 2005; Ciofolo & Pendu 2013). There is considerable uncertainty surrounding the geographic and taxonomic limits of all described subspecies (Fennessy et al. 2013). Furthermore, recent genetic work suggests that several subspecies may even represent distinct species (Brown et al. 2007). Globally, only the forms G. c. peralta from West Africa, which recent genetic evidence has confirmed is indeed

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The feeding behaviour of giraffe in Niger

The remaining West African giraffes (Giraffa camelopardalis) are found in Niger (62 individuals in January 1998). Their feeding behaviour was studied by direct observation during two periods of 6 and 12 mo. The giraffe’s diet is diverse: at least 45 plant species were eaten, depending on spatial arrangement and a given plant’s stage of growth. Time spent browsing during the dry season was twice that devoted to browsing during the rainy season (46 and 23 % respectively). Time spent feeding

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