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The giraffe of Nairobi National Park: Home range, sex ratio, the herd and food

The giraffe of Nairobi National Park, Kenya have been studied for one year. Each animal seen has been photographed from the left side and the pattern on the neck used to recognize each individual. While the pattern may become darker with age, it does not significantly change in detail even over many years. At present 65 adult male, 72 adult female and 30 immature giraffe can be recognized. Movements of individuals are described as well as associations with other individuals.

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The sex ratio of the giraffe

61.5 per cent of the 117 young giraffes born in captivity were males. A similar preponderance of males has been observed among adult giraffes in Transvaal and in Amboseli National Reserve, but not in Nairobi National Park where 60.7 per cent of the adults were females. The possible causes of such abnormal sex ratios are discussed. (Article is in French)

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Ecological separation of the large mammal species in the Tarangire Game Reserve, Tanganyika

The ecological separation of 14 common ungulate species living in close contact with each other in a Tanganyika game reserve is shown to be achieved by six different factors: 1. the occupation of different vegetation types and broad habitats; 2. the selection of different types of food; 3. the occupation of different areas at the same season; 4. the occupation of the same area at different seasons; 5. the use of different feeding levels in the vegetation; 6. the occupation

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The distribution of the giraffe in Africa

The range and numbers of giraffe have been decreasing in Africa with the expansion of civilization and with extensive poaching activities. Various articles have been published recently on the status of the large wild animals in different countries of Africa and the reports on the giraffe, together with data from correspondence with many of the African Game Departments are incorporated here to give a complete picture of the present distribution and abundance of the giraffe in Africa.

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The behaviour of giraffe giraffa camelopardalis in the eastern transvaal

The giraffe in South Africa live entirely in the Eastern Transvaal, a lowveld region primarily of grass or veld with scattered bushes and low trees. The giraffe browse on a wide variety of trees in the spring and fall when few leaves are available, but in summer when all the trees are in foliage they are much more selective. The giraffe spend most of the day and part of the night feeding, especially the early morning and late afternoon. In

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Notes on the reproduction of Baringo giraffe

Koga (Kagaku Oaho, 27, 1938) reported on the birth of a Nigerian giraffe, female, Giraffa camelopardalis peralta at the Ueno Zoo at 7:24 pm. Parturition time was reported to be three hours, nineteen minutes. The calf gained its feet at 7:56 pm, 32 minutes after birth, though it did not eat for 42 hours.

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African Antelope Database

The purpose of this report is to provide those interested in antelope conservation with the information currently held by the IUCN/SSC Antelope Specialist Group on the conservation status of each antelope species (and selected subspecies) in sub-Saharan Africa. This species-wide view complements the country-based reports in other recent Antelope Specialist Group publications. Threats to the survival of antelopes arise fundamentally from the rapid growth of human and livestock populations, and consequent degradation and destruction of natural habitats and excessive offtake

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Translocation of Rotschilds giraffes Giraffa camelopardalis rothschildi from Kenya to Uganda

Between March and April 1997, 3 giraffes were captured from Lake Nakuru National Park in Kenya and translocated to Kidepo Valley National Park in Uganda a total distance of approximately 800 kilometers. The translocation was conducted because the population in Kidepo consists of only 1 female and 5 male giraffes. Therefore more females were needed to start to re-establish a viable breeding population. The numbers of giraffes in Kidepo dropped from 400 between 1967 & 1972 (Ross et al. 1976;

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Species diversity, distribution and conservation of Namibian mammals

Namibia’s extant mammal fauna of 250 species represents about 75% of the southern African region’s species richness, 83% of generic richness and 98% of familial richness. Fourteen species are presently recognized as endemic (75% or more of the global population occurring within Namibian borders). These endemics occur in the Namib Desert, pro-Namib transition zone and adjoining escarpment, and are primarily rupicolous. The Namibian endemic mammal fauna is characterized by the monotypic Petromuridae, and the rodent genera Gerbillurus and Petromyscus. The

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Winning by a neck – Sexual selection in the evolution of giraffe

A classic example of extreme morphological adaptation to the environment is the neck of the giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis), a trait that most biologists since Darwin have attributed to competition with other mammalian browsers. However, in searching for present-day evidence for the maintenance of the long neck, we find that during the dry season (when feeding competition should be most intense) giraffe generally feed from low shrubs, not tall trees; females spend over 50% of their time feeding with their necks

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