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African Antelope Database

The purpose of this report is to provide those interested in antelope conservation with the information currently held by the IUCN/SSC Antelope Specialist Group on the conservation status of each antelope species (and selected subspecies) in sub-Saharan Africa. This species-wide view complements the country-based reports in other recent Antelope Specialist Group publications. Threats to the survival of antelopes arise fundamentally from the rapid growth of human and livestock populations, and consequent degradation and destruction of natural habitats and excessive offtake

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Translocation of Rotschilds giraffes Giraffa camelopardalis rothschildi from Kenya to Uganda

Between March and April 1997, 3 giraffes were captured from Lake Nakuru National Park in Kenya and translocated to Kidepo Valley National Park in Uganda a total distance of approximately 800 kilometers. The translocation was conducted because the population in Kidepo consists of only 1 female and 5 male giraffes. Therefore more females were needed to start to re-establish a viable breeding population. The numbers of giraffes in Kidepo dropped from 400 between 1967 & 1972 (Ross et al. 1976;

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Species diversity, distribution and conservation of Namibian mammals

Namibia’s extant mammal fauna of 250 species represents about 75% of the southern African region’s species richness, 83% of generic richness and 98% of familial richness. Fourteen species are presently recognized as endemic (75% or more of the global population occurring within Namibian borders). These endemics occur in the Namib Desert, pro-Namib transition zone and adjoining escarpment, and are primarily rupicolous. The Namibian endemic mammal fauna is characterized by the monotypic Petromuridae, and the rodent genera Gerbillurus and Petromyscus. The

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Winning by a neck – Sexual selection in the evolution of giraffe

A classic example of extreme morphological adaptation to the environment is the neck of the giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis), a trait that most biologists since Darwin have attributed to competition with other mammalian browsers. However, in searching for present-day evidence for the maintenance of the long neck, we find that during the dry season (when feeding competition should be most intense) giraffe generally feed from low shrubs, not tall trees; females spend over 50% of their time feeding with their necks

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On comparing the behaviour of zoo housed animals with wild conspecifics as a welfare indicator, using the giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis) as a model

To assess the validity of using wild behavioral data as a welfare indicator for zoo animals, the time budgets of 19 captive giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis), from four zoos were compared with the time budgets of wild giraffe from Hwange National Park, Zimbabwe. Differences were shown to exist between the behavior of wild and captive giraffe. However, only the duration of lying differed significantly across zoos. Correlations demonstrated that both enclosure size and feed restriction affected the locomotor activity of the

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West Africa’s last giraffes: The conflict between development and conservation

The distribution of the giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis peralta Thomas 1898) has greatly diminished in West Africa, and now the last remaining population, reduced to less than 100 individuals, is found in Niger. These giraffes of West Africa are seriously threatened by extensive deforestation and clearing of their habitat. They live peacefully with humans and cattle and participate in an essential way in the dynamics of vegetation. Their disappearance would represent another step towards the impoverishment of the inheritance of Africa, a

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Feasibility of characterizing reproductive events in large nondomestic species by transrectal ultrasonic imaging

The feasibility of using transrectal ultrasonography for imaging the in situ morphology of the reproductive tract of females of several large nondomestic and endangered species was studied. Two black (Diceros bicornis) and 1 white (Diceros simus) rhinoceros, 2 Asian (Elaphus maximus) and 2 African (Loxodonta africana) elephants, 4 banteng (Bos javanicus), 1 gaur (Bos taurus), 1 giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis), and 1 bactrian camel (Camelus bactrianus) were examined. Real-time ultrasonic images were obtained for the following structures: 1) rhinoceros—corpus luteum, ovarian

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The impacts of elephant, giraffe and fire upon the Acacia tortilis woodlands of the Serengeti

The reduction in canopy cover of the Seronera woodlands since the mid- 1960s can be largely attributed to the destruction of mature Acacia tortilis trees by elephants. The development of the tree regeneration that has colonized the gaps in the mature canopy is being suppressed by giraffe browsing and periodic burning. A simple model is presented which simulates these impacts upon the dynamics of the A. tortilis population. Height-specific impact rates of these three agents are quantified. Between 1968 and

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The giraffe and its food resource in the Serengeti

The dynamics of the giraffe population of the Serengeti were quantified to ascertain the response of the population to the increasing biomass of the available browse resource. Aerial counts conducted in 1971 and 1976 together with analyses of fecundity and mortality data suggest a rate of population increase of some 5–6% per annum. Compared with the dynamics of a stable giraffe population in Nairobi National Park, the sub-adult components of the Serengeti regional populations are larger and juvenile growth rates

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The effect of translocation on the Rothschild’s giraffes

In July 1977, twenty one Rothschild’s giraffes (Giraffa camelopardalis rothschildi LYDEKKER) were trans-located by the Kenya Game Department from Lewa Downs Farm, Soy to Nakuru National Park. The objective of the translocation was to accord the  giraffes and opportunity to establish themselves in a protected environment. The research described in this thesis was carried out between August 1978 and July 1979 in both Nakuru National Park and Lewa Downs Farm, Soy. The aim of this study was to compare selected

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